Deal names appointees for Criminal Justice Reform Council

May 16, 2011

Gov. Nathan Deal today named the list of those who will serve on his Special Council on Criminal Justice Reform.  The council was created by HB 265, which Deal signed into law last month during a bill signing ceremony in Hall County.

With this council now in place, it is our hope to uncover new approaches to make Georgia communities safer while increasing offender accountability, improving rehabilitation efforts and lowering costs,” said Deal. “While this effort should ultimately uncover strategies that will save taxpayer dollars, we are first and foremost attacking the human costs of a society with too much crime, too many people behind bars, too many children growing up without a much-needed parent and too many wasted lives.

“I look forward to hearing the findings and recommendations of this intelligent group of individuals, and I feel confident that together they will produce good legislation that the General Assembly will take up next year.”

The council consists of 13 members who have been tapped by the governor, House Speaker David Ralston, Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle and Chief Justice Carol Hunstein.  Their picks are as follows:

Gov. Deal

Todd Markle, Executive Counsel to the Governor (Gov. Deal’s designee)

David McDade, District Attorney, Douglas County

Linda Evans, Attorney, member of Judicial Qualifications Commission, Atlanta

Ken Shigley, President-elect of the State Bar of Georgia, Atlanta

Speaker Ralston

Rep. Mary Margaret Oliver (D- Decatur)

Rep. Jay Powell (R-Camilla)

Rep. Willie Talton (R- Warner Robins)

Lt. Gov. Cagle

Sen. John Crosby (R-Tifton)

Sen. Bill Hamrick (R-Carrollton)

Sen. Ron Ramsey (D-Decatur)

Chief Justice Hunstein

Chief Justice Carol Hunstein, Georgia Supreme Court

Hon. Ural Glanville, Superior Court Judge, Atlanta Judicial Court

Hon. Michael P. Boggs, Superior Court Judge, Waycross Judicial Court

The commission will study--as provided by HB 265--Georgia’s criminal justice and correctional system, and  will search for ways to enhance public safety, reduce victimization, hold offenders more accountable, enhance probation and parole supervision and better manage a growing prison population. Its goals will focus on increasing public safety, improving rehabilitation and lowering state expenses.

The group will work in direct conjunction with The Pew Charitable Trusts, a non-profit group that will analyze the ideas of the council to help to improve the outcome of public policy.

The council will report its findings and recommendations by Nov. 1 to a special committee consisting of a bipartisan, 16-member group of legislators who will then consider legislation for next year’s session. The bill expires July 1, 2012.