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Deal recognizes individuals for achievements in the arts and humanities

Deal recognizes individuals for achievements in the arts and humanities

October 2, 2013
Gov. Nathan Deal today announced the recipients of the second annual Governor’s Awards for the Arts and Humanities. Fifteen individuals and organizations have been recognized for their significant contributions to Georgia’s civic and cultural vitality through service to the humanities or excellence in the arts. The awards were presented in partnership with the Georgia Council for the Arts and the Georgia Humanities Council. 
 
“The arts contribute to state and local economic growth by providing a diversified and sustainable means for creating jobs and attracting revenue,” said Deal. “These individuals and organizations contribute significantly to Georgia’s excellent quality of life that we are able to provide our citizens, relocating or expanding businesses, and visitors.” 
 
Fifteen members of Georgia’s arts and humanities communities were chosen from a selection of nominations from around the state. These recipients represent a diverse group of individuals and organizations that have laid the groundwork for Georgia’s growing creative industry through innovative programs, community collaboration and long-term financial commitment.
 
The recipients of the 2013 Governor’s Award for the Arts and Humanities are:
 
Kay Beck, Atlanta
Linda Crowe Chesnut, Athens
Dr. John Ferling, Carrollton
Melissa Fay Greene, Atlanta
Tim Howard, Chatsworth
Marianne Lambert, Atlanta
Chuck Leavell, Dry Branch
Frank Maloy, Tifton
Merryll Penson, Athens
Allan Vigil, Morrow
The Center for Puppetry Arts, Atlanta
Colquitt County Arts Center, Moultrie
Fox Theatre Institute, Atlanta
Moving in the Spirit, Atlanta
United Shape Note Singers, Atlanta
 
Detailed information about the recipients is available on www.gaarts.org.
 
About the Award
The 2013 Governor’s Award was created by Atlanta photographer Diane Kirkland. For many years Kirkland worked as the marketing photographer for the State of Georgia. She produced the images used in Georgia’s advertising campaigns, promotional publications, and travel features for newspapers and magazines (domestic as well as international). Kirkland was also the exclusive photographer for two large photographic books: “Oglethorpe’s Dream, A Picture of Georgia” and “Democracy Restored, A History of the Georgia State Capitol” published by the University of Georgia Press and the Georgia Humanities Council. For the past few years, she has been working as a freelance photographer with a special emphasis on natural landscapes and historic preservation. Her photographs have received numerous awards and are in the permanent collections of the Museum of Contemporary Art of Georgia (Atlanta); the Photographic Center (Tucson, Ariz.); the Georgia Museum of Art (Athens); Hartsfield/Jackson Atlanta Airport International Terminal; and the Shepard Spinal Center (Atlanta). She was awarded the Georgia Department of Natural Resources Artist in Residence grant for Ossabaw Island and continues to enjoy hiking and photographing in the remote and beautiful places of the South.  
 
About the Award Partners
The Georgia Council for the Arts (GCA) is a division of the Georgia Department of Economic Development that works to cultivate the growth of vibrant, thriving Georgia communities through the arts. GCA provides grant funding and statewide programs and services that support the vital arts industry, preserve the state’s cultural heritage, increase tourism and nurture strong communities. Funding for GCA is provided by appropriations from the Georgia General Assembly and the National Endowment for the Arts. Visit www.gaarts.org
 
The Georgia Humanities Council promotes and preserves the stories and cultural legacies of the state’s people — from the past to the present and into the future — to enrich their lives and strengthen their communities. An informed and educated Georgia understands historical and cultural trends, respects the life of the mind, utilizes critical thinking in decision-making, and promotes mutual respect and civility. Funding for the Georgia Humanities Council is provided by the state of Georgia, the National Endowment for the Humanities, foundations, donors and our partners. Visit www.georgiahumanities.org